ISKCON News: World News (Page 58 of 59)

World News

  • Meat Consumption: Environment's No.1 Enemy?
    EVER since “An Inconvenient Truth,” Al Gore has been the darling of environmentalists, but that movie hardly endeared him to the animal rights folks. According to them, the most inconvenient truth of all is that raising animals for meat contributes more to global warming than all the sport utility vehicles combined.
  • Kasakhstan Persecution Increases
    The Kazakh authorities have increased controls on religious communities in recent years, especially by banning unregistered religious activity and increasing punishments for it. Among recent victims have been Council of Churches Baptists, who refuse on principle to seek state registration, and Jehovah's Witnesses.
  • Anti-Freeze in Neem

    Canadian health officials are recalling the Indian-made 'Neem' brand toothpaste found to contain high levels of diethylene glycol (DEG), a poisonous chemical used in antifreeze.

    Consumers are cautioned to stop using the toothpaste, made by the Calcutta Chemical Co. Ltd., and return it to where it was sold.

  • Vatican OKs Nuclear Energy

    The Vatican criticised countries such as Italy which have abandoned nuclear power, saying atomic energy is only evil when used to make weapons.

  • Top Scientist Advocates Genocide for 90% of World Population

    Famous professor and ecological researcher Eric R. Pianka championed the notion that the Earth can only be saved if ninety percent of the human beings alive today are purged from the planet via an airborne Ebola virus. Astonishingly, after advocating for a future in which more than 5,000,000,000 persons would die a slow and agonizing death, many influential members of the audience stood to their feet and applauded.

  • Poll: More Muslims Reject Bombings
    WASHINGTON -- Muslims around the world increasingly reject suicide bombings and other violence against civilians in defense of Islam, according to a new international poll dealing with how the world's population judges their lives, countries and national institutions.
  • Cow-talk
    They have one word in their vocabulary and it's a single syllable at that.

    But farmers claim cows appear to 'moo' in regional accents, despite their limited conversational skills.
  • On the Internet, Everyone May Find You're a Dog
    On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog, as a famous New Yorker cartoon once said. Nobody knows when you're the CEO of a big company, either, or a popular doctor, or a columnist posting comments on his or her own writings if you're writing under an assumed name. And while anonymity can be an attractive feature of the Internet, how and when you use it raises some interesting ethical questions.
  • A Healthy sugar-replacement?
    Do you like to glug away at cans of sugar-free fizzy drinks but simultaneously worry that the artificial sweeteners might not be that much better than sugar itself? So the news of a plant-derived sweetener with claimed health-promoting effects would be good news.
  • Beef Worse Than Cars' Emissions, Study Shows
    Producing 2.2lb of beef generates as much greenhouse gas as driving a car non-stop for three hours.

    Japanese scientists used a range of data to calculate the environmental impact of a single purchase of beef.
  • What Price for Friendship? For Some Pet Owners, There’s No Limit

    In the USA, spending on veterinary care is expected to reach US$9.8 billion in 2007, up from US$7.2 billion five years ago, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association.

  • Expecting Too Much From Sunday
    Sunday is a time for preaching. Serious preaching. Preaching with an edge. Preaching that looks sinners in the eye and says, "God loves you, now get it right." Preaching that looks the complacent in the eye and says, "God loves you, now get outside yourself."
  • Film Captures 9/11 Backlash Against Sikh Americans
    In the days following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, twenty-year-old Stanford University student Valarie Kaur heard of fellow Sikhs who were harassed, beaten and even murdered. Initially, she felt numb, unsure how to respond. Then she remembered her grandfather and the core Sikh belief he taught her: Nam Dan Isnan."In order to realize yourself," Kaur remembers him saying, "in order to realize God, you must act here and now without fear."So, armed with a video camera and the help of her 18-year-old cousin, Amandeep Singh Gill, Kaur drove across the country to capture the stories of Sikhs, Muslims, Arabs and others who were victims of a post-9/11 backlash.
  • Research Shows Promising Results for Mad Cow Vaccine
    Researchers are celebrating the promising results of a vaccine given to mice that could result in an effective human drug for BSE (Mad Cow disease). But will it work humans?
  • Modern Students Devour Old Math

    Kamlesh Shetty had used a trick from a quaint concept called Vedic math, a compilation of arithmetic shortcuts believed to have been written by ancient Indians who lived centuries before Christ, during a glorious period in Indian history called the Vedic Age. Its math has now crawled into the 21st century to further Shetty's dream of cracking a nasty engineering entrance exam.

  • Jewish Ritual Baths Attracting New Interest
    They used to be everywhere there were Jews. Mikvahs, ritual purification pools used by observant Jewish women, have been considered so important to Jewish communities that even a sacred Torah could be sold to build one.
  • TV Chef Threatens Kids with Electrocution if They Go Veg
    The TV chef - famed for his tyrannical methods in the kitchen - said it would be his "worst nightmare" if his children turned their backs on eating meat, and joked that he would electrocute them as a punishment.
  • Bringing Peace to Manipur

    MANIPUR (Kangla Online): A unique programme highlighting the importance of peace and ways and means of bringing it in the north eastern region of India, escpecially in Manipur, and generally in the whole world will be held in Manipur in the month of November this year (2007). The programme, an international peace conference, is expected to be attended by many important dignitaries including the President of India APJ Abdul Kalam and Nobel laureates from all over the world.

  • The Good News About the Bad News
    Why, asks a reader, have new community churches had "such tremendous growth," while older denominational congregations show "declining church attendance?"
  • Muslim Magazines Discover an Untapped Market
    Holding an American flag and wearing a bright-white grin beneath her head scarf, Wardaw Chaudhary, a 16-year-old from Tulsa, Okla., radiated confidence and optimism, the perfect cover girl to grace the first issue of Muslim Girl magazine.
  • FOOD: Vegetarian menus root in beefy Buenos Aires
    The term "cocina vegetariana," or vegetarian cuisine, tends to draw blank stares or outright pity from Argentines on the streets of this city, considered by many the red meat capital of the world. But vegetarians need not write Buenos Aires off as a travel destination. Krishna Veggie Lunch is a lively two-room restaurant that serves vegetarian food all day. It is adorned with icons, shrines, paintings, and murals depicting all faiths. It also has a disco ball hanging from the ceiling and a soundtrack that ranges from OutKast to Bob Dylan to Indian dub.
  • Books: The Dawkins Confusion: Naturalism ad absurdum

    Richard Dawkins is not pleased with God:The God of the Old Testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all of fiction. Jealous and proud of it; a petty, unjust unforgiving control-freak; a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic-cleanser; a misogynistic homophobic racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal....

  • WORLD: Indian Finance Minister Asks for Billions to Help Poor
  • HEALTH: Garlic 'Stinks' at Lowering Cholesterol, New Study Shows

    When it comes to lowering cholesterol levels, garlic stinks, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

  • ENGLAND: Thousands of churches face closure in ten years

    by Ruth Gledhill, Religion CorrespondentThe London Times, February 10, 2007Thousands of churches face closure, demolition or conversion in the next decade, leading to the demise of some branches of Christianity in Europe, according to experts.

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